Amber Sleep Lamp Reviews

The Science of Amber Sleep Lamps

The blue light contained in sunlight and SAD lamps is highly beneficial in the morning, preventing Seasonal Affective Disorder, non-seasonal depression, and circadian rhythm disorders. Blue wavelengths of light tell our bodies to that it’s daytime. However, at night, these same blue wavelengths can block up to 99% of our bodies’ melatonin production, causing insomnia, shift work disorder, and even significant increases in rates of cancer and diabetes. Common lighting devices like computer screens, fluorescent lights, and cellphone screens emit high levels of blue light. Numerous studies demonstrate that limiting your nighttime exposure to amber wavelengths of light, either through the use of amber sleep lamps or blue-blocking amber glasses will allow healthy melatonin production (an average increased melatonin production of 90 minutes), leading to healthier sleep patterns and reduced insomnia.

Popular Amber Sleep Lamps:

SomniLight Amber Sleep Lamp Review
Price: 49.99 (free shipping)
Rating: 5/5
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SomniLight’s sleep lamp uses “specialized amber LEDs that allow healthy melatonin production and normalized circadian rhythms, allowing insomnia sufferers to fall asleep up to an hour earlier.” Creates excellent blue-free light for ambient nighttime lighting or reading. SomniLight lamps also make excellent nursery lamps, as the gentle amber light will not interfere with either the mother’s or infant’s sleep patterns. Lamps feature five brightness settings, including a nightlight setting. Click here to find SomniLight amber lampsnursery lamps, and red night lights.

Pros: Excellent little lamp. Helped me cure my Delayed Sleep Phase Syndrome.

 

LowBlueLights.com Amber Booklight Review
Price: 29.95 (+$8 shipping)
Rating: 4.6/5

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The LowBlueLights booklight features 18 amber LEDs, to ensure healthy melatonin production in the evening. Includes a 3-foot A/C adapter for direct power. Internet browsing at night has been demonstrated to exacerbate insomnia in two ways: overstimulation and blue light emission. In contrast, reading a traditional or e-ink book in the evening has been shown to significantly decrease sleep latency and increase overall sleep satisfaction. Find LowblueLight’s book light here.

Cons: Only one brightness setting, and a very short battery life (around 1 week between changing batteries).

SomniLight Amber Sleep Booklight Review
Price: 29.99 (free shipping)
Rating: 4.9/5
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Low Blue Book Light

SomniLight Amber Book Light

A portable version of SomniLight’s amber sleep lamp that clips conveniently to books and e-readers. Internet browsing at night has been demonstrated to exacerbate insomnia in two ways: over-stimulation and blue light emission. In contrast, reading a traditional or e-ink book in the evening has been shown to significantly decrease sleep latency and increase overall sleep satisfaction. This portable book light features 8 amber LEDS, and a total of four brightness settings, providing you with exactly as much or as little light as you need. Find SomniLight’s low-blue book light here.

Pros: Easily my favorite book light on the market. Very relaxing and effective.

Cons: Fairly short battery life (around 3 weeks between battery changes).

 

Sources:

How do Sleep Lamps Work?

Burkhard, K. & Phelps, J.R. (2009). Amber lenses to block blue light and improve sleep: A randomized trial. Chronobiology International, 26 (8), 1602-1612.

Gooley, J. J., Chamberlain, K., Smith, K. A., Khalsa, S. B. S., Rajaratnam, S. M. W., Van Reen, E., … Lockley, S. W. (2011). Exposure to Room Light before Bedtime Suppresses Melatonin Onset and Shortens Melatonin Duration in Humans. The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, 96(3), E463–E472. doi:10.1210/jc.2010-2098

Kayumov L, Casper RF, Hawa RJ, Perelman B, Chung SA, Sokalsky S, Shapiro CM (May 2005). “Blocking low-wavelength light prevents nocturnal melatonin suppression with no adverse effect on performance during simulated shift work”. J. Clin. Endocrinol. Metab. 90 (5): 2755–61.